“Not Just a Snapshot” on CBC’s North by Northwest Program

18 01 2014

To my utter delight, earlier this week I spoke with Sheryl MacKay, the host of North by Northwest on CBC radio, about the work in Not Just a Snapshot:  The Thompson Drainage through Field Journal Art.  In anticipation of the interview (which is airing this morning, Saturday January 18), I’m posting images of the pieces Sheryl and I talked about in the interview.  The link to the podcast can be found here http://www.cbc.ca/nxnw/

Scroll down to the entry for January 18 and my segment of the program starts at just about 20 minutes into the podcast.

 

Hill and River.  Shadow box containing two field journal volumes. Pen and Watercolour, with accompanying artifacts.

 

 

Tranquille River Image

Winter’s Press.  Shadow Box with Field Journal Painting.  Pen and Watercolour on Paper.

June’s Roar.  Shadow Box with Field Journal Painting.  Pen and Watercolour on Paper.




Not Just a Snapshot: The Thompson Drainage through Field Journal Art

3 01 2014

It’s happening!  Much of the work that I have completed over the last 12 months will be on display during January at the Kamloops Art Council, and over the next little while I will post more work from the show here!

My good friend Beki suggested that I make postings to this blog more regular, so I will endeavor over the next 12 months to make sure I post on the first Friday of each month (more often if I can, but on the first Friday for sure).

For now, I’ll just include a written description of the show:

“Every landscape is storied and we all come to know these stories in our own way. Natural history field journals, with their easy confluence of art and science, promote a multi-layered conversation with the land. Within the journal format (bound in a book or spread across a full sheet of paper) watercolor paintings erupt between lines of handwritten text, poetry jostles for space alongside natural history observations, and “to do” lists languish beside sightings of returning songbirds. Too often overlooked, the Thompson Drainage runs rich with the stories of a living, breathing world. In this exhibit, field journal art documents and celebrates the natural history we can find just beyond our backyards.”